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merelygifted:

Wilhelm Mansion and Carriage House is an historic mansion and carriage house located at Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania. The house was built in 1877, and is a three-story dwelling in the Gothic Revival style. A two room addition was built in 1888. It is constructed of granite and measures 40 feet wide and 50 feet deep. It features a multi-gabled roof, four corbelled chimneys, and art glass windows. The two-story granite carriage house was built in 1890.
It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.
[Above via wikimapedia]
… The Gothic Revival style was also popular for churches, where high style elements such as castle-like towers, parapets, and tracery windows were common, as well as the pointed Gothic arched windows and entries. The Carpenter Gothic style is a distinctive variation of the Gothic Revival style featuring vertical board and batten wooden siding, pointed arches and incised wooden trim. The name comes from the extensive use of decorative wood elements on the exterior. While some examples remain, the pure Carpenter Gothic style is not well represented in Pennsylvania.
The most commonly identifiable feature of the Gothic Revival style is the pointed arch, used for windows, doors, and decorative elements like porches, dormers, or roof gables. Other characteristic details include steeply pitched roofs and front facing gables with delicate wooden trim called vergeboards or bargeboards. This distinctive incised wooden trim is often referred to as “gingerbread” and is the feature most associated with this style. Gothic Revival style buildings often have porches with decorative turned posts or slender columns, with flattened arches or side brackets connecting the posts. Gothic Revival style churches may have not just pointed arch windows and porticos, but often feature a Norman castle-like tower with a crenellated parapet or a high spire.
Many examples of Gothic Revival buildings of both high style and more vernacular character can be found across the state. The high style buildings, mansions, churches, prisons and schools sometimes offer ornate architectural details. The more common vernacular buildings may have only a few Gothic details, usually pointed arch windows and a front facing gable with wooden trim. Gothic Revival details may also be found in urban settings on rowhouses or duplexes. Later in the 19th century, Gothic Revival details were mixed with elements of other Victorian era styles to become a style known as the Victorian Gothic. In the early 20th century, a distinct variation of the Gothic Revival style, known as the Collegiate Gothic style, developed primarily for educational buildings….
via Penn State - Architecture - Mid-19th Century Period

merelygifted:

Wilhelm Mansion and Carriage House is an historic mansion and carriage house located at Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania. The house was built in 1877, and is a three-story dwelling in the Gothic Revival style. A two room addition was built in 1888. It is constructed of granite and measures 40 feet wide and 50 feet deep. It features a multi-gabled roof, four corbelled chimneys, and art glass windows. The two-story granite carriage house was built in 1890.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

[Above via wikimapedia]

… The Gothic Revival style was also popular for churches, where high style elements such as castle-like towers, parapets, and tracery windows were common, as well as the pointed Gothic arched windows and entries. The Carpenter Gothic style is a distinctive variation of the Gothic Revival style featuring vertical board and batten wooden siding, pointed arches and incised wooden trim. The name comes from the extensive use of decorative wood elements on the exterior. While some examples remain, the pure Carpenter Gothic style is not well represented in Pennsylvania.

The most commonly identifiable feature of the Gothic Revival style is the pointed arch, used for windows, doors, and decorative elements like porches, dormers, or roof gables. Other characteristic details include steeply pitched roofs and front facing gables with delicate wooden trim called vergeboards or bargeboards. This distinctive incised wooden trim is often referred to as “gingerbread” and is the feature most associated with this style. Gothic Revival style buildings often have porches with decorative turned posts or slender columns, with flattened arches or side brackets connecting the posts. Gothic Revival style churches may have not just pointed arch windows and porticos, but often feature a Norman castle-like tower with a crenellated parapet or a high spire.

Many examples of Gothic Revival buildings of both high style and more vernacular character can be found across the state. The high style buildings, mansions, churches, prisons and schools sometimes offer ornate architectural details. The more common vernacular buildings may have only a few Gothic details, usually pointed arch windows and a front facing gable with wooden trim. Gothic Revival details may also be found in urban settings on rowhouses or duplexes. Later in the 19th century, Gothic Revival details were mixed with elements of other Victorian era styles to become a style known as the Victorian Gothic. In the early 20th century, a distinct variation of the Gothic Revival style, known as the Collegiate Gothic style, developed primarily for educational buildings….

via Penn State - Architecture - Mid-19th Century Period

39,260 notes

garconniere:

Cultural Appropriation: A conversation by Sanaa Hamid

This body of work is an exploration of the extent of cultural appropriation and encourages a discussion about it. I give the appropriator and the appropriated the opportunity to defend themselves and create a dialogue between them, while maintaining a neutral stance myself. I am not attacking those who appropriate, merely educating and creating awareness. Neutrality is key in this series, as i remove myself from my political and social status and opinions, stripping the problem to the most basic issue; taking an item that means a great deal to somebody and corrupting it.

(via loveyourchaos)

7,449 notes

kateoplis:

Summer Solstice, the First Day of Summer, is tonight at 10:04 PST.

Coincidentally, it’ll be followed by the year’s largest supermoon. “In the early hours of Sunday, June 23, the moon will officially reach its full phase and will be the closest to Earth that it will be all year.”

Poland celebrates by releasing thousands of beautiful lanterns (video). You can check out how other countries celebrate, or just make up your own ritual.

Happy Midsummer’s dream, you dreamers.

(via archinspires)